June 18, 2017

50 years ago today: Day 3 of the Monterey Pop Festival.

The lineup on the last day: Ravi Shankar, The Blues Project, Big Brother and the Holding Company, The Group With No Name, Buffalo Springfield (with David Crosby), The Who, Grateful Dead, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Scott McKenzie, The Mamas & the Papas.









51 comments:

Quayle said...

Great stuff.

Breaking through boundaries.

It was a theme of the generation - break through boundaries.

And now a new set of boundary builders and enforcers are busy at work.

And the basic method and result is the same: punish those on the outside.

And we are back where we started, or worse: enforcement with a vengeance.

Takin' 'bout my generation.

Lately things don't seem the same.

wildswan said...

My nieces and nephews ask me about the Sixties and I play them "If You Go to San Francisco" and then "Hotel California." We went from one to other, I say, and that wasn't all fun and I don't know why the change happened. But there were moments ... And then there were other .... moments.

eddie willers said...

I'm guessing Neil bugged out (as usual) and so Stephen called David.

LordSomber said...

I always liked the scoring work Ravi Shankar did on "Charly."

Bay Area Guy said...

Scott McKenzie? Really?

Dan C said...

And the after the fact award for Most Treacly Performance at Monterey '67 goes to..... drum roll...... Scott Mckensizie. Runner up... Buffalo Springfield.

Hendrix - flawless.

Earnest Prole said...

All the leaves are brown and the sky is grey

Lyle Sanford, RMT said...

That was my summer between high school and college and the radio was full of those sounds. It's really amazing how music can take you back in time to the feelings when you first heard it. Thanks for posting.

Ann Althouse said...

McKenzie is important because he was featured in the closing act and because the propaganda in the song was about to play out in the Summer of Love. There's the art and there is the culture. I am looking back on both.

Bill Peschel said...

The Who ... such an explosive sound for such an inane song. At least Keith was still alive, barely, to film "Won't Get Fooled Again." That captured the reality of what the ruling class is doing to us today.

Bill Peschel said...

And I can say that hearing "Summertime Blues" back then and not saying, as I do now, "such a special snowflake." What a difference a few decades makes.

sinz52 said...

50 years have passed, and the music of the 1960s hasn't been equalled since.

Temujin said...

Thanks, Ann, for all three days of memories. Great, great stuff. I think Keith Moon is still vibrating somewhere in this universe.

Mary Beth said...

I didn't expect to see Peter Tork. That was a bit of a surprise.

Dan C said...

McKenzie is important because...

Agree 100%. Notice also, Peter Tork introduced Buffalo Springfield, but the Monkees weren't invited to play... not hip enough. LOL in retrospect.

madAsHell said...

I'm guessing Neil bugged out (as usual) and so Stephen called David.

Yes!

madAsHell said...

I didn't expect to see Peter Tork.

He was a former roommate of Stills.

eddie willers said...

I had tickets to the Stills-Young Band concert in Atlanta. Of course Neil left everybody in the lurch.

Can't remember if I got refunds for those tickets or not. Oh well, it turned out the album sucked. For once, the parts were much greater than the sum.

wild chicken said...

I loved Springfield but not that song. I didn't know what it meant to say. Didn't like Stills's phony gospel.

Rock n Roll Woman, now there was a classic.

Douglas said...

Thanks for the great clips! For those of you too young to remember the Sixties, remember this: it had a great soundtrack, but the plot sucked.

wild chicken said...

Gee the mamas and papas sounded good live.

I know the event was their brainchild but by this time they seemed lame next to the others. Almost bubblegum. A wrecking Crew creation, but their music had a dark east coast vibe.

William said...

Ravi Shankar was good for bathroom breaks and catching up on the news. Nonetheless, Ravi made a huge contribution to American music. He impregnated the woman who gave birth to Norah Jones.

madAsHell said...

He impregnated the woman who gave birth to Norah Jones.

Laslo has a similar story.

madAsHell said...

Scott McKenzie? Really?

Scott McKenzie passed on the 2012, but he also wrote the song Kokomo for the Beach Boys.

Quayle said...

As the son of a music professor and the father of a pretty good drummer, I can say that none of the three of us have a clue why Keith Moon played the rhythm notes he did.

Yes the home base beat was often infused and carried by Townsend, but even with Pete's chops, why did Keith hit what he hit when he chose to hit it?

One of the mysteries of the universe.

Laslo Spatula said...

My Theory is that Althouse's love of the Hippie Era is greatly enabled by her Missing Sense of Smell.

I am Laslo.

Quayle said...

Laslo, Ann knows that every town must have a place where phony hippies meet. Psychedelic dungeons popping up on every street.

Will Cate said...

Jerry Garcia used to look back and chuckle at the fact the Dead were sandwiched in between The Who and Hendrix. "It's a miracle anyone even remembers we were there."

This was compounded by the fact that they refused to let their set be filmed; they were very contemptuous of John Phillips and his business partner Lou Adler ("They're just in it for the bread, man")

Alex said...

"If You're Going to San Francisco" is the worst song of the 1960s.

chickelit said...

Laslo Spatula said...My Theory is that Althouse's love of the Hippie Era is greatly enabled by her Missing Sense of Smell.

LOL

I'm surprised DBQ didn't comment here. She actually saw the Janis Joplin performance: link

Alex said...

You can have the 1960s, I'll take the early 1990s.

Unknown said...

Lou Adler produced some great records. (Possibly Carole King's "Tapestry" is the most famous of these) Who cares if he did it for money?

"Kokomo" was the best thing about the incredibly bad movie "Cocktails" and enabled the Beach Boys to get back on the charts and hang on for for (so far) seems to be their swan song "That's Why God Made The Radio", going out on a totally unexpected high note.

Unknown said...

I'll see your "If You're Going to San Franciso" and raise you a Bobby Goldsboro "Honey".

gpm said...

"That was my summer between high school and college."

Me, too.

--gpm

gpm said...

Oops I meant grammar school and high school, after being reminded that Althouse was 16.

--Gonzales

Dr Weevil said...

Do you hate Bobby Goldsboro's 'Honey'. Of course you do.
Do you have 3:36 to spare? Who doesn't?
If you answered 'yes' to these two questions, you owe it to yourself to go to YouTube and listen to the Austin Lounge Lizards sing 'Shorty's Gal/Honey' (audio-only link). It takes some time to get started, but you will not regret it.

Ken B said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Unknown said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
chickelit said...

@Unknown: link (for people with memories).

Will Cate said...

Unknown said:

"Lou Adler produced some great records. (Possibly Carole King's "Tapestry" is the most famous of these) Who cares if he did it for money?"

Oh absolutely -- no argument from me... that was just the ethos of the San Fran music scene at that moment in time.

Will Cate said...

"If You're Going to San Francisco" is the worst song of the 1960s.

Quite agree... if you talk to anybody who was there at the time they'll tell you that 1966 was actually the best year in Haight-Asbury ... before it was overrun by teenage runaways (and the native SF crowd hated that song, which of course was an LA creation)

Darrell said...

Do you hate Bobby Goldsboro's 'Honey'. Of course you do.

Nope. Wrong again. If I were handing out advice, I'd suggest people stay away from somebody that doesn't like Goldboro's Honey.

Ann Althouse said...

The 2 deletions above are for the sin warned against in the instructions directly above the comments composition box: "don't do that thing of putting in a lot of extra line breaks."

You have to find another way to depict comedic pausing or whatever you think you are doing with that.

William said...

Not much love for Ravi Shankar. Not much hate either. The forgotten man of that scene. Well, he never electrified his sitar or sold out. His great hit, Monotone with Ripples, remains as fresh today as the moment he played it.

Ann Althouse said...

By the way, I loathe the Scott McKenzie song. I thought it was embarrassingly treacly when it came out, that is, when I was only 16. It was a patently deceptive ad for a city that would cause dumb people to migrate foolishly to a place where they were too naive to belong. I knew that as a 16 year old living with my parents in suburban New Jersey and wanting very sincerely to get involved in the hippie action — especially the LSD. You don't just think "love" and put flowers in your hair!

Unknown said...

I will repost my deleted comment from above.
Sorry about the extra empty lines, I did not think they were excessive.

I was just mentioning that the song that was number 1 the longest in 1966 was the Ballad of the Green Berets, so it was not all hippies all the time.

Bart

Unknown said...

>I was just mentioning that the song that was number 1 the longest in 1966 was the Ballad of the Green Berets, so it was not all hippies all the time.

The only west coast rocker I can think of who was pro Viet-Nam was Jan Berry, and he was sidelined from preforming at the time, though he was working on a psychadelic record Carnival of Sound during his recovery.

Robert Cook said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Robert Cook said...

"I didn't expect to see Peter Tork. That was a bit of a surprise."

He was close friends with Steven Stills, as someone already noted. Tork auditioned for the Monkees because of Stills. Stills had auditioned for it but decided not to pursue it. He recommended Tork to the producers and he encouraged Tork to audition.

Michael Gazonymous said...

If you're goin' to San-Fran-Cisco be sure to wear some flowers in your hair. And bring a jacket.

eddie willers said...

Weird synchronicity that I just HAVE to post. (you'll see it roll around at the end)

So I'm reading Alan Sepinwall's review of the recent episode of Fargo (season 3, episode 8) where he mentions that the Ray Wise character's name is Paul Marrane and that is one of the names attributed to "The Wandering Jew".

Never hearing of this legend, I researched it and found out The Wandering Jew was a man condemned to wander the earth until Jesus' second coming. He was either a fellow Jew who mocked Jesus on the way to crucifixion, or, in the most popular version, a Roman centurion named Longinus who speared Jesus in the side while up on the cross to see if Jesus was still alive.

So I Google "Longinus" and read that he had become Saint Longinus. On the Wikipedia page, down at the bottom where they have the "In popular culture" section, I see that a whole series of books were written about Casca Rufio Longinus, (the Casca series...available for Amazon Kindle Unlimited customers for free. Through Althouse's portal, of course) about the unfortunate centurion who is now fated to be "The Eternal Mercenary" and fighting until Jesus comes home.

The synchronicity?

The Casca series was written by Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler!

Yes....THAT Barry Sadler.